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A RARE VICTORIAN DRESSING CASE BY ASPREYS

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A RARE VICTORIAN DRESSING CASE BY ASPREYS
ladies-dressing-vanity-case-antique-aspreys-box1_5793
ladies-dressing-vanity-case-antique-aspreys-box1_5793
ladies-dressing-vanity-case-antique-aspreys-box1_5793
ladies-dressing-vanity-case-antique-aspreys-box1_5793
ladies-dressing-vanity-case-antique-aspreys-box1_5793
SKU: RM6721/814

1 in stock

A RARE VICTORIAN DRESSING CASE BY ASPREYS

£42,000.00

A RARE VICTORIAN DRESSING CASE BY ASPREYS

Circa 1853
Stock Number: RM6721/814
Height: 17 ins / 43.18 cms
Width: 15.25 ins / 38.74 cms
Depth: 13 ins / 33.02 cms
Price: £42000

This rare silver edged coromandel lady’s dressing case is of superb quality. It opens to reveal a leather and velvet interior with 14 cut glass containers with silver gilt and blue enamel lids. The front section lifts off to expose two further trays with mirrors and ivory brushes, glove stretchers and a shoe horn. This case has
two Asprey’s patent locks, the lower one allowing access to a drawer holding 31 manicure and sewing accessories. The inside of the lid is fitted with a rectangular easel mirror and is stamped Asprey Manufacturing to her Majesty, 166, Bond Street, W. The unusual elements in this box are two secret drawers in the sides
of the base which are released by spring loaded mechanisms in the brush compartment. The assay stamps are London 1853 and 1867.

Contents
14 cut glass containers with incised silver gilt and enamelled lids
21 matching implements for sewing, writing and dressing
A large mirror and a smaller one, magnifying
A tape measure in an acorn
A double ended spoon
Two vesta cases
A gold thimble
4 pars of scissors
A double ended seal
Ivory hair and clothes brushes
A rectangular silver gilt easel mirror
An ivory shoe horn and glove stretchers

Provenance:
From a private collection.
William Asprey originally founded a silk printing business in Mitcham, Surrey in 1781 which he quickly expanded into a luxury goods emporium. By 1841, his son Charles had acquired premises in Bond Street and advertised ‘articles of exclusive design and high quality, whether for personal adornment or personal accompaniment and to endow with richness and beauty the table and homes of people of refinement and discernment.’ Understandably dressing cases became an early speciality as the wealthy took advantage of the exciting new form of travel offered by the railways. Asprey won a gold medal for dressing cases at the international Exhibition of 1862.

Asprey’s showroom, London

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